Could climate change spell trouble for Kenya’s largest river?

2 December, 2014 by (comments)

This post first appeared on the Thomson Reuters Foundation climate blog.  Ahead of the Global Landscape Forum in Peru, it helps to remember exactly why landscapes are important. They give us the bigger picture, to connect the dots between the many people who use an ecosystem and what for. It’s that bigger picture which helps put climate change into perspective. InRead More …

Tagged With: , , ,
Filed Under: Africa @en, CIAT in the media, Climate Change, Climate Change website, Regions, Soils, Soils website

Costing the earth: who’s responsible?

17 November, 2014 by (comments)

Wielding a hammer, John Kabola steps back and surveys his day’s work. The quarry cut into the hills of Kenya’s Upper Tana watershed reveals deep layers of earth like a sliced cake. Quarry stones are in demand – the construction industry is thriving. That’s good news for Kabola, who has risen to quarry operator, investing his income in aRead More …

Tagged With: , , , , , ,
Filed Under: Africa @en, Climate Change, Soils, Soils website

Newly-discovered rice gene goes to the root of drought resistance

6 August, 2013 by (comments)

Crop Scientists have discovered a gene in rice that could significantly improve its resistance to drought, according to new research. The DEEPER ROOTING 1 (DRO1) gene makes the roots of rice plants grow downwards instead of outwards, enabling them to reach water held deeper in the soil. It means that even under conditions of extreme water stress, the plantsRead More …

Tagged With: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Filed Under: Crop diversity, Crops @en, Crops website, Rice @en

Quesungual – remember the name, and not just for Scrabble

10 December, 2012 by (comments)

When Hurricane Mitch struck Honduras in 1998, torrential downpours triggered landslides that wiped out huge areas of crops. This compounded a shockwave of malnutrition spreading across the country caused by an intense El Niño-driven drought the year before. But some farmers suffered only minor losses or none at all: they were practicing Quesungual (“Ke-sun-gwal”). If Quesungual sounds like someRead More …

Tagged With: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Filed Under: Climate Change, Latin America and the Caribbean, Soils, Soils website

Nicaragua: water harvesting work featured in New Agriculturist

8 May, 2012 by (comments)

If you’ve ever been to Nicaragua during the dry season, you’ll know why we’ve been getting very excited about some water harvesting rpojects there. For the latest on the work – by the CIAT-based Latin American Fund for Irrigated Rice (FLAR) – have a look at this feature, just published as part of a Climate Sustainable Agriculture special featureRead More …

Tagged With: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Filed Under: Agro-ecology and Economics @en, CIAT in the media, Climate Change, Latin America and the Caribbean, Regions

Water harvesting project makes a splash

24 November, 2011 by (comments)

If you’ve been following the CIAT blog for the last few months, you’ll know we’ve been getting rather excited about a series of water harvesting pilot projects going on in Nicaragua, which have completely transformed food production there. This is much, much more than just collecting rainwater in buckets. Read more about it in this piece, published by theRead More …

Tagged With: , , , , , , , ,
Filed Under: Crops @en

Water scarcity = food insecurity? Think again

28 July, 2011 by (comments)

Award-winning team didn’t go with the flow As the world population edges closer to 7 billion this year, on-target for a projected peak of 9 billion by 2050, we won’t just need more food. We’ll need more water, in order to grow more food. Right? Actually, not quite. The prevailing wisdom – that population pressure will trigger a globalRead More …

Tagged With: , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Filed Under: Crops @en